Blue Flamingo Entertainments

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Travelling on the Underground with a Full Drum Kit: Tips from Daoud Merchant

Travelling with drummer Daoud Merchant post-gig recently, BF had an insight into navigating with full drums on the Underground.  Here are some top tips BF learnt from him!

2001) Pack Tight and Small: Daoud has an amazing pack down kit (Whitney Drums Nesting Penguin) which he has on a trolley attached using bungie cables, then cymbals on his back.  Literally a walking drum kit.

Victoria-line-Picture2-500x2982) Aim High with Raised Paving: Some platforms have raised paving to meet the height of the carriage (especially the Victoria line).  This is for wheelchair and luggage access: aim for this part of the platform!  It means you don’t have to lift heavy equipment – you can just roll it on.

giphy-23) Look for Young Couples:  One of the biggest obstacles to tube travel is stairs.  However, show you’re struggling near to a young couple and often the gentleman will want to impress his lady by showing strength and helpfulness.  Two birds with one stone: kit transported down stairs, chap glowing in his lady’s eyes.

U61XM54) Stand by the door most used, Kit in front of you: Otherwise all passengers will see is a gap in people at the other end/side of the carriage – and keep pushing.  They can’t see all your kit on the floor.  That way they know straight away that there is less space available (not sure if this will prevent irritation…though, we try!)

giphy-35) Get Ready Early: so you can get off quickly.  It takes time to get everything ready!

Thanks for the tips Daoud!

First Published 11/10/11

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The Importance of Feeding Musicians….

Feed musician band hire blue flamingoWe’re not talking about ‘feeding’ them as if they’re pigeons.  More like, why it’s a great idea to feed them if you’ve hired them. Sometimes, people forget and they get a little sad. And grumpy.

A few things to remember…

1. If they’re playing an evening set, that’s dinner time. They’ve been setting up since 15:00. They’re on at 21:00 and it’s 19:00. They’ll be hungry.

2. Hot meals make people way happier than sandwiches. (You know that’s true.)

3. We have learned that: fed musicians = happy musician = epic music.

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Stoop Quintet Album Review: Confession

output_wXvZjVWe heard Stoop Quintet live at the 2014 London Jazz Festival and it’s great to hear the tracks they performed there on their debut album Confession.

The opening track, Ranch, features many of the ideas which will become the album’s signature sounds. It starts with a simple groove-based riff played by pianist/band leader Jonathan Brigg and drummer Dave Smyth. After the rest of the band have entered we hear an inspired solo by guitarist Alex Munk bringing the tune to a symphonic climax. The ostinato riff returns, followed by saxophonist Sam Miles announcing his arrival in a feisty solo.

The second tune, Turn, is based on a repetitive piano and bass unison riff with guitar and drums filling the complex time. It’s a simple yet very effective idea. Munk and Miles solo once more with rhythm section keeping effortless time and creating a great depth of sound. It is incredibly satisfying when after Munk and Miles’ solo the band return to the riff. The whole song euphorically lifts and the satisfaction of everything coming together is palpable. But it is fleeting and the listener yearns to dwell in that sound world for longer.

Fable is a Zeitgeist piece with its deliciously warm sax ostinato over gently relentless piano lines falling like tears. It’s a desperately sad tune full of wistful longing. A lyrical sax solo by Miles is followed by the frankly haunting sound of Munk on guitar. You are drawn to the interplay of Smyth and Munk dancing together and in the background the ever-present piano and bass riff eternally pulse. The head then returns, if you can even call it a head, for it is really a riff: the oscillating heartbeat of this tune.

In Stoop Kid, (named after the band’s namesake, everyone’s favourite 90s cartoon Hey Arnold!) gone is the world of Fable. The tune opens in a chaotic conversation of sounds upon which the chatter then unites in unison stabs of exclamation. This is followed by a conversation between instruments, with different voices and characters clearly evident. When we read the album sleeve we discovered it is based on episode of Hey Arnold! where the protagonist is ‘afraid to leave his stoop’. The tension is evident and conversation clear.

Sevens is a cacophony of scalic runs in complex time with the band walking up and down their instruments. In the strict formal counterpoint the classical influences are evident creating a mesmerising effect in its relentlessness.

Listening to Spring Song after Sevens is like entering a different wold. Mellifluous sax sings over the guitar. It is refreshing to hear an album that is not afraid of variety or diatonic tonality. When the rest of the band come in (piano with the trademark elegant drone) the colours are gorgeous, a palette of watercolours meandering together to create beautiful new shades. Spring Song also features an elegant solo from bassist Flo Moore.

It’s notable that (as we’ve said before) this isn’t a band of soloists. Instead Moore, Smyth and Brigg ‘hold the complex grooves together, support and interplay with Miles and Munk like an experienced family and put the spark into the group.’

The album’s title track Confession is a tune of guilt, worry, strain and obsessiveness. The 7/8 groove is interspersed by a variety of different emotions: calm, angst and destruction. This becomes the freeist tune on the album and we hear a mind distracted, evolving and filled with tension. This is where it all comes out, a wonderful musical confession of feeling, ending with bartok-esque bell tolls on the piano. The confession is over.

The final tune of the album, Soldier On, is a slow balm to soothe the tension of Confession. The ethereal opening guitar statement is followed by a tune that is resolute in keeping going. The signature repetitive lines are evident. They are literally soldiering on, lost in melody and colour.

Confession is an album with classical and free jazz influences sitting side-by-side. Lyrical melodies sing above beautiful, agonisingly relentless ostinato-esque musical lines. It is an album that explores so many colours but never sits on one too long, and is never satisfied with just one sound. It is an album that constantly seeks new direction, a river pushing against the rocks with flair to make new paths. Confession is a creatively inspired, diverse and emotionally complex debut album. Can’t wait to hear what comes next.

Album out on 10th February on ASC Records

-BF

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#BFRecommends Jazz Picks in London this Feb

Sam crockatt Quartet james maddren kit downesTuesday 2nd Feb 2016 – Sam Crockatt Quartet CD Launch @ Pizza Express 19:00 £15
Saxophonist/composer Sam Crockatt launches his third album ‘Mells Bells’ on Whirlwind Recordings. The band is made up of four of the most in-demand and creative musicians on the UK scene, including Kit Downes on piano, Oli Hayhurst on double bass, and James Maddren on drums. Their first album ‘Howeird’ won album of the year in the Parliamentary Jazz Awards in 2009′ more info here

Thursday 11th Feb 2016 Zoe Rahman Trio @ St James Theatre 20:00 £17.50
‘Known for her powerful technique, wide-ranging imagination and exuberant performance, she has become a highly sought-after musician, working most recently with the likes of Courtney Pine, George Mraz and Jerry Dammers’ Spatial AKA Orchestra. She is joined by her trio featuring drummer Gene Calderazzo and bass player Mark Lewandowski’ more info here

Jazz at the Oxford whats on in london blue flamingoMonday 22nd Feb 2016 – Can of Worms presents Mike Soper Trio @ Jazz at the Oxford 20:30 £10/£5
‘Can of Worms explores that happy and unpredictable space where written and improvised worlds collide, diving deep into group improvisations and compositions featuring taut, tense grooves, wailing sax-confessionals and all-out glorious free-jazz’ more info here

 

Thursday 25th Feb 2016 – Fletch’s Brew @ Royal Albert Hall/Elgar Room 21:15 £13.75
‘In 2010, drumming tour de force Mark Fletcher founded Fletch’s Brew with Laurance Cottle (bass), Jim Watson (keyboards), Paul Stacey (guitar), Freddie Gavita (trumpet/flugelhorn) – a band which blurs the boundaries of musical styles and surpasses preconceived notions of jazz’ more info here

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I’m starting out! Which Saxophone should I buy?

Blue Flamingo SaxophoneWhat is your goal?
Are you a beginner looking to try things out, or are you an adult who wants to invest in a really good instrument and take time to develop a skill? This will effect what type of instrument you get

What are the saxophone brands & what price should I go for?
There are 4 ‘big’ name sax brands – all of which are excellent. They are: Yamaha, Yanigasawa, Mauriat and Selmer. If your budget is smaller, go for the beginner/student models (under £800). If the skys’ the limit – try them all. But remember more expensive does not equal better.

Where should you buy?
Go somewhere you can try the instrument out. And take someone you trust with you. The same instrument can sound totally different with two different players. The more expensive instrument also isn’t necessarily better. It depends on you.

We have recommend Howarth of London for saxophones.  We’ve known them for years and years and they’ve always been great and really friendly. They’re based near Baker Street in London. If you’re further afield try JP Packers in Taunton.

What else should you know?
Mouthpieces make as much as a different to the sound as the actual saxophone. It’s worth trying these out. But as a beginner – stick with what often comes with the instrument, or go with a Selmer C*.

MORE QUESTIONS? GET IN TOUCH!  WE’RE HAPPY TO HELP!

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3 Reasons to Hire a Harpist

1. Amazing Sound
The harp is surprisingly versatile, with a big warm sound. Harpists don’t just do classical either, they also sound mellifluous playing popular tunes.

H-ARTIST-SLIDE-2
2. Class & Style
Nothing quite beats the look of the harp and harpists bring an effortless spark of elegance to any event.  Whether playing musical magic at a party or strumming you down the aisle, there is nothing to rival the class and style the harp brings.


3. Affordable

As you’re hiring just one person, harpists are affordable.  With a smaller expense then a full band you still get a great live energy and passion.

Want to know more? Check out our harpists here!

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Review: Let Spin Album Launch @ Vortex

let spin vortex let go album launch ruth golfer moss free finally panted christ williams blue flamingo wedding party

Much has been spun about ‘Prog-Post Jazz’ group Let Spin.  On a customary wet and miserable Dalston evening the Vortex audience were, wine glasses in hand, ready to hear their second album launch: Let Go.

Ruth Goller (bass) started the set with her tune I like to Sound Like a Rainforest. With its lyrically lamenting bass line it drew the audience’s attention with simple effectiveness.  Sax and guitar entered with the melody and it quickly settled into a strong 6/8 groove.  The improv section was much freer and angrier, giving us the first taste of the inner mind of Let Go.  Ending with a ‘bell’ toll, Rainforest was a great emotional journey of sounds.

Rainforest set the structural precedent for the next two tunes (Disa & All Animals are Beautiful): strong groove based head in irregular time, heavily free middle section, with a return to the groove at the end.

Disa by drummer Finlay Panter was rhythmically driven (9/4, 4/4, 5/4 time) and it was immediately clear that each member of Let Spin has a clearly distinctive compositional voice. Whilst the improv sections in the first three tunes went in similar directions, the tunes were clearly characterised by their writers.

Fourth in the set was the guitar led E.V.A., a tune by Guitarist Moss Freed. The sax danced on top of the guitar line like the crest on a wave: sax sat perfectly with the guitar and was yet comfortably independent.  E.V.A. was the first tune that ‘kept time’ throughout, refreshingly departing from the signature sound of the set thus far.  It was well placed in the set and by the applause level afterwards, it was an audience favourite.

The final tune of the first set was saxophonist Chris Williams’ ‘Walt’s Waltz’, a great tune in which the raucous Led Bib influences are clear.  (We initially understood the title to be ‘Waltz Waltz’ and with the 6/4 riff this made sense.  Nice to have an extra layer of meaning). The massive sound was ice water to the face (we like ice water) and the epic chaos in the middle was fun and a great way to end the first set.

Let Spin resists many of the traditional quartet idioms, for example each member taking a ‘token solo’. Sax acts as a voice, taking the tune and often giving us the most explosive solos. There are clear sections ‘without sax’ in which the various band members let loose, each musician dripping with virtuosity and creating varied and complex sound worlds.

The second set opened with 102 Hill Street, a tune from their first album Let Spin. The band came alive in this tune – a triumphal announcement letting us know that they were ready to play and show us what they’ve got.

Let Go contains two tunes from each band member. Their website describes them as ‘a band that is not afraid to make the most of their individual voices’. This is actually true (hurray for accurate band descriptions). The variety of the timbres in which they inhabit makes it much more interesting and accessible.

They play on this and the audience were asked to guess who wrote the next tune: Rotation. (we got it right! Panter.  Stickers for us).  His naturally rhythmically driven writing identifies strongly with him.

Next up was Killing our Dreams (Williams), a beautiful tune, as near to a ballad as we would ever hear with Let Spin. The writing for sax is highly lyrical, with repetition within a small range with Freed playing beautifully underneath. The band built behind the simple sax line in an utterly symphonic way in its colour and texture. The sound was huge, and the symphonic effect was completed by the three tonic major chords upon which it finished. True Beethoven.

Rothko’s Field had a latin flavour with Goller, Panter and Freed filling the space perfectly with their signature taste. Up and At Them (Williams) finished the set. The strong bass line played as ever energetically and powerfully by Goller, led to a great solo from Freed and top playing from Panter.  The massive timbres were a great way to finish.

To such applause they gave us an encore lullaby with which to send us home, the final tune from their first album, A Change Is Coming.

Let Spin certainly gave us a show. We cannot undervalue the great and distinctive voices brought by each member of the band. The variety is great, keeps us listening and exploring. Williams, Freed, Goller and Panter each write so powerfully and differently it is a wonderful thing when it all comes together.

Check out their rest of their tour dates here.
Buy the albums here .

Let Spin Album Launch @ Vortex, Saturday 24th October 2015
Set 1
1. I like to Sound Like a Rainforest
2. Disa
3. All Animals Are Beautiful
4. E.V.A.
5. Walt’s Waltz

Set 2
6. 102 Hill Street
7. Rotation
8. Killing Our Dreams
9. Rothko’s Field
10. Up and At them
Encore: A Change is Coming

-BF

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New Brochure! Would you like one?

We have a new brochure, which you can download in PDF form here.  Or you can request a hard copy here!

Love – ‘Your local friendly, professional & creative music company providing superb & exciting music for all occasions & events.’  -BF

Blue Flamingo Entertainments Brochure

Blue Flamingo Entertainments Brochure

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Down Street Wedding Photos

Popular Blue Flamingo Band Down Street had the privilege of playing at a beautiful wedding just over a month ago.  The gorgeous venue was the Great Hall at Royal Holloway.
Here are some beautiful photos from Kit Myers Photography.

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Review: Riot Ensemble @ MeWe360 30.01.2015

Riot Ensemble, Blue Flamingo, Harry Cameron-Penny MeWe360 Aaron Holloway-Nahum Blue Flamingo Kate Walter Adam Swayne

With an evening out in Soho, you never know what to expect. Sat in MeWe360 it was a surprisingly traditional urban setting.  It is a ‘modern office’, but this space with its sofas, random chairs and a piano made a great setting for chamber music – a genre as old as music itself.  It’s rare to be sitting on the floor listening to great contemporary music in such intimate surroundings and as Riot Ensemble‘s Artistic Director Aaron Holloway-Nahum  introduced the evening we knew we were in for a great night.

The programme started with Felipe Lara‘s, “Livro dos Sonhos” (Book of Dreams) a song for clarinet with piano.  Angular angry unisons began the piece which was full of timbral contrasts. Moments of diatonic melody spattered this sound world of harmonics, accents and frights with masterful clarinet control by clarinettist Harry Cameron-Penny.  Adam Swayne on Piano played with precision and the pair play very well together.

Next up was the UK premiere of Marco Momi‘s ‘Reloading Vanishing’ for solo flute.   Kate Walter played this so very engagingly. The piece calls for vocalisation, gasps, emotive outbursts as well as simultaneous flute playing. Walter’s character brought the piece alive.  A Riot Ensemble trademark is to use other media in their work (see our previous review here). This evening they had a screen with information, most interestingly a preview of the score. Thus in ‘Reloading Vanishing’ it was intriguing to read the instruction ‘confidentially’ at the top of the score, getting a glimpse of the composer’s ‘intention’.*

Amy Beth Kirsten‘s ‘Speak to Me’ for pianist finished the first half, with Holloway-Nahum introducing Kirsten’s composition style as a ‘physical not intellectual’ activity.  Swayne absolutely owned this piece – which is based on the myth of Echo, Narcissus and Juno – and eloquently (and helpfully) reminded the audience of the story.  The music has three parts.  Firstly Echo talking incessantly to distract Juno, her adulterous husband, secondly Juno cursing Echo and finally Echo frustrated that she can no longer speak.  Kirsten is just a great writer.  Her improvisational influences are so evident.  The first section is great stream-of-consciousness for pianist in which Swayne both sings/speaks and plays.  The cursing is dark and repetitive – a migraine of intensity of a curse and Swayne’s quite remarkable skill as an actor emerged as he spoke with harsh intensity.  Finally when Echo is trapped and can no longer speak, the music recalls what was once spoken and Swayne (consciously or not) realised the pain on his face. Someone had taken away his power to speak.  Echo tries to recall the music but can’t assert herself.  This is an epic piece of music by Kirsten.  The end is heartbreaking, a requiem for a voice that has been lost and a soul destroyed.

The second half  opened with Augusta Read Thomas‘ ‘Capricci’ (Hummingbird Romance) a piece inspired by New Orleans jazz improvisation.  It was a great dance for flute and clarinet and showed Thomas’ clear and intimate understanding of these instruments.  This duet was great to observe. Cameron-Penny and Walter moved together as they played demonstrating flawless technique and great virtuosity.  At moments the tonalities echoed Schoenberg just as he was beginning his 12-tone experimentation.

‘Invocation to Ate’ by Arne Gieshoff was next up, a piece focussing on obsession.  Once more the range of the flute’s colours was superbly demonstrated by Walter’s excellent technique and performance.

The night finished with two trios, the first being Jose Manuel Serrano‘s ‘Espantajo de Resca’.  Holloway-Nahum once more told the work’s story: music evoking the ghostly figures left on the sand and bark as the flood recedes from Serrano’s hometown.  This piece is an echo of an image with haunting breezes of melody.  Once again Swayne at the piano uses his voice in the work – but the eery sounds don’t add human reality to the work, rather they take it away, creating an even darker, beautiful sound.  The rich sounds from Walter and Cameron-Penny developed Serrano’s world into a beautiful soundscape.

The evening’s title piece ‘The Riot’ by Jonathan Harvey finished the night, a work designed to show the (as Holloway-Nahum put it) ‘sheer virtuosity’ of the musicians and how it was ‘utterly clear how hard’ it is to play.  This is a mayhem of a piece.  Moments of utter diatonicism (cycle of fifths, major thirds) were interspersed with exclamation and madness.   It’s actually great to hear a composer who’s not afraid to use even pulse and functional harmony every now and again – jazz influences too were clear.

It was a great concert with phenomenal music and well thought out programme. The setting was intimate and this made a big change to how the music was received:  sitting comfortably with a drink in your hand is an inviting setting.  It is a new (and yet so old) way to hear the music.  Holloway-Nahum’s great insight into the composer’s ideas and thoughts (Harvey’s daughter Anna and Gieshoff himself were present too)  made the music much more tangible and thought-provoking.

Check out the Riot Ensemble’s upcoming performances here.  Well worth it for this breath of fresh contemporary musical air.

 

Musicians
Clarinet – Harry Cameron-Penny
Piano –  Adam Swayne
Flute – Kate Walter

Full Programme
1) Felipe Lara ‘Livro dos Sonhos’ (Book of Dreams)
2) Marco Momi ‘Reloading Vanishing’
3) Amy Beth Kirsten ‘Speak to Me’

Interval

4) Augusta Read Thomas – ‘Capricci’ (Hummingbird Romance)
5) Arne Gieshoff  – ‘Invocation to Ate’
6) Jose Manuel Serrano – ‘Espantajo de Resca’
7) Jonathan Harvey – ‘The Riot’

 

*there is no way on earth we are going to get into a discussion on the realisation of the composer’s intention and whether or not it is a valid idea.  This is just a review.  Hence the quotation marks.  The end.  ~BF