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Press Release: Cardiff-born musician launches all or nothing bid for debut album

29.03.17 

For immediate release

Cardiff-born musician launches all or nothing bid for debut album

 

Pianist and Royal Academy of Music jazz graduate, Peter Lee, is crowdsourcing his debut album for five piece band and string quartet through Kickstarter in an all or nothing bid to create ‘The Velvet Rage’. 

Inspired by Alan Downs’ book of the same title, the album expresses the highs and lows of Lee’s personal experience as a musician. Downs worked as a psychologist in America, offering counselling to gay men and he has become familiar with their most common personal battles. Towards the end of the book he offers wisdom and guidance towards a goal he names ‘authentic validation’. Lee’s debut is tribute to this sentiment, showcasing compositions Lee has written over the last 10 years, drawing from his educational, professional and personal journey.

Lee commented: “Gay men and women have been granted the opportunity to marry in so much of the western world; we can walk through the streets hand-in-hand and yet it would be naïve to think that personal struggles related to sexuality aren’t still going on. Attacks on the LGBTQ community still happen, but we’ve seen our communities respond with an unprejudiced sense of unity. I’m so grateful that I live in an age where I can be out and proud and express my perspective through the medium of music.”

Cardiff-born and London-based, Lee received his undergraduate degree from Leeds College of Music and his campaign to raise £5,000 has attracted support from across the country with over 55% raised at the halfway mark.

For such a qualified musician, Lee’s story is one of humour and determination. His first gig with his band prompted an official complaint from the examiner-in-chief at the Royal Academy of Music. It was his final recital for his masters in jazz piano, but Lee went in with a band full of pop musicians. The audience whooped and cheered so raucously that a formal email was sent to all students about ‘appropriate’ exam conditions.

While touring with Alice Zawadzki, Lee worked with the Manchester-based “Amika” String Quartet whose stunning playing led him to arrange his music for strings, and invite them to a week-long recording session in the Autumn of 2016. From there, the album progressed into an offering that spans a decade of work with an authentic and highly talented group of musicians.

Lee needs to raise the full £5,000 by midnight on Tuesday 11 April and would welcome support from all corners. Visit www.bit.ly/petelee to join this exciting new project.

 – End –

For further information, contact:

 

Leah Thomas @ Blue Flamingo

Notes to editors:

The Musicians

Lee recorded for five days in Fieldgate studio in Cardiff.  The musicians involved are: Pete Lee (piano/compositions), Josh Arcoleo (sax), Alex Munk (guitar), Huw Foster (bass), Ali Thynne (drums), and the “Amika” Strings: Laura Senior (violin), Rich Jones (violin) Lucy Nolan (viola) and Peggy Nolan (cello). The session was recorded by Andy Lawson, Alex Killpatrick & Matt Williams at Fieldgate Studios in South Wales. Matt Roberts produced the album.

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Travelling on the Underground with a Full Drum Kit: Tips from Daoud Merchant

Travelling with drummer Daoud Merchant post-gig recently, BF had an insight into navigating with full drums on the Underground.  Here are some top tips BF learnt from him!

2001) Pack Tight and Small: Daoud has an amazing pack down kit (Whitney Drums Nesting Penguin) which he has on a trolley attached using bungie cables, then cymbals on his back.  Literally a walking drum kit.

Victoria-line-Picture2-500x2982) Aim High with Raised Paving: Some platforms have raised paving to meet the height of the carriage (especially the Victoria line).  This is for wheelchair and luggage access: aim for this part of the platform!  It means you don’t have to lift heavy equipment – you can just roll it on.

giphy-23) Look for Young Couples:  One of the biggest obstacles to tube travel is stairs.  However, show you’re struggling near to a young couple and often the gentleman will want to impress his lady by showing strength and helpfulness.  Two birds with one stone: kit transported down stairs, chap glowing in his lady’s eyes.

U61XM54) Stand by the door most used, Kit in front of you: Otherwise all passengers will see is a gap in people at the other end/side of the carriage – and keep pushing.  They can’t see all your kit on the floor.  That way they know straight away that there is less space available (not sure if this will prevent irritation…though, we try!)

giphy-35) Get Ready Early: so you can get off quickly.  It takes time to get everything ready!

Thanks for the tips Daoud!

First Published 11/10/11

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Stoop Quintet Album Review: Confession

output_wXvZjVWe heard Stoop Quintet live at the 2014 London Jazz Festival and it’s great to hear the tracks they performed there on their debut album Confession.

The opening track, Ranch, features many of the ideas which will become the album’s signature sounds. It starts with a simple groove-based riff played by pianist/band leader Jonathan Brigg and drummer Dave Smyth. After the rest of the band have entered we hear an inspired solo by guitarist Alex Munk bringing the tune to a symphonic climax. The ostinato riff returns, followed by saxophonist Sam Miles announcing his arrival in a feisty solo.

The second tune, Turn, is based on a repetitive piano and bass unison riff with guitar and drums filling the complex time. It’s a simple yet very effective idea. Munk and Miles solo once more with rhythm section keeping effortless time and creating a great depth of sound. It is incredibly satisfying when after Munk and Miles’ solo the band return to the riff. The whole song euphorically lifts and the satisfaction of everything coming together is palpable. But it is fleeting and the listener yearns to dwell in that sound world for longer.

Fable is a Zeitgeist piece with its deliciously warm sax ostinato over gently relentless piano lines falling like tears. It’s a desperately sad tune full of wistful longing. A lyrical sax solo by Miles is followed by the frankly haunting sound of Munk on guitar. You are drawn to the interplay of Smyth and Munk dancing together and in the background the ever-present piano and bass riff eternally pulse. The head then returns, if you can even call it a head, for it is really a riff: the oscillating heartbeat of this tune.

In Stoop Kid, (named after the band’s namesake, everyone’s favourite 90s cartoon Hey Arnold!) gone is the world of Fable. The tune opens in a chaotic conversation of sounds upon which the chatter then unites in unison stabs of exclamation. This is followed by a conversation between instruments, with different voices and characters clearly evident. When we read the album sleeve we discovered it is based on episode of Hey Arnold! where the protagonist is ‘afraid to leave his stoop’. The tension is evident and conversation clear.

Sevens is a cacophony of scalic runs in complex time with the band walking up and down their instruments. In the strict formal counterpoint the classical influences are evident creating a mesmerising effect in its relentlessness.

Listening to Spring Song after Sevens is like entering a different wold. Mellifluous sax sings over the guitar. It is refreshing to hear an album that is not afraid of variety or diatonic tonality. When the rest of the band come in (piano with the trademark elegant drone) the colours are gorgeous, a palette of watercolours meandering together to create beautiful new shades. Spring Song also features an elegant solo from bassist Flo Moore.

It’s notable that (as we’ve said before) this isn’t a band of soloists. Instead Moore, Smyth and Brigg ‘hold the complex grooves together, support and interplay with Miles and Munk like an experienced family and put the spark into the group.’

The album’s title track Confession is a tune of guilt, worry, strain and obsessiveness. The 7/8 groove is interspersed by a variety of different emotions: calm, angst and destruction. This becomes the freeist tune on the album and we hear a mind distracted, evolving and filled with tension. This is where it all comes out, a wonderful musical confession of feeling, ending with bartok-esque bell tolls on the piano. The confession is over.

The final tune of the album, Soldier On, is a slow balm to soothe the tension of Confession. The ethereal opening guitar statement is followed by a tune that is resolute in keeping going. The signature repetitive lines are evident. They are literally soldiering on, lost in melody and colour.

Confession is an album with classical and free jazz influences sitting side-by-side. Lyrical melodies sing above beautiful, agonisingly relentless ostinato-esque musical lines. It is an album that explores so many colours but never sits on one too long, and is never satisfied with just one sound. It is an album that constantly seeks new direction, a river pushing against the rocks with flair to make new paths. Confession is a creatively inspired, diverse and emotionally complex debut album. Can’t wait to hear what comes next.

Album out on 10th February on ASC Records

-BF

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#BFRecommends Jazz Picks in London this Feb

Sam crockatt Quartet james maddren kit downesTuesday 2nd Feb 2016 – Sam Crockatt Quartet CD Launch @ Pizza Express 19:00 £15
Saxophonist/composer Sam Crockatt launches his third album ‘Mells Bells’ on Whirlwind Recordings. The band is made up of four of the most in-demand and creative musicians on the UK scene, including Kit Downes on piano, Oli Hayhurst on double bass, and James Maddren on drums. Their first album ‘Howeird’ won album of the year in the Parliamentary Jazz Awards in 2009′ more info here

Thursday 11th Feb 2016 Zoe Rahman Trio @ St James Theatre 20:00 £17.50
‘Known for her powerful technique, wide-ranging imagination and exuberant performance, she has become a highly sought-after musician, working most recently with the likes of Courtney Pine, George Mraz and Jerry Dammers’ Spatial AKA Orchestra. She is joined by her trio featuring drummer Gene Calderazzo and bass player Mark Lewandowski’ more info here

Jazz at the Oxford whats on in london blue flamingoMonday 22nd Feb 2016 – Can of Worms presents Mike Soper Trio @ Jazz at the Oxford 20:30 £10/£5
‘Can of Worms explores that happy and unpredictable space where written and improvised worlds collide, diving deep into group improvisations and compositions featuring taut, tense grooves, wailing sax-confessionals and all-out glorious free-jazz’ more info here

 

Thursday 25th Feb 2016 – Fletch’s Brew @ Royal Albert Hall/Elgar Room 21:15 £13.75
‘In 2010, drumming tour de force Mark Fletcher founded Fletch’s Brew with Laurance Cottle (bass), Jim Watson (keyboards), Paul Stacey (guitar), Freddie Gavita (trumpet/flugelhorn) – a band which blurs the boundaries of musical styles and surpasses preconceived notions of jazz’ more info here

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Review: Let Spin Album Launch @ Vortex

let spin vortex let go album launch ruth golfer moss free finally panted christ williams blue flamingo wedding party

Much has been spun about ‘Prog-Post Jazz’ group Let Spin.  On a customary wet and miserable Dalston evening the Vortex audience were, wine glasses in hand, ready to hear their second album launch: Let Go.

Ruth Goller (bass) started the set with her tune I like to Sound Like a Rainforest. With its lyrically lamenting bass line it drew the audience’s attention with simple effectiveness.  Sax and guitar entered with the melody and it quickly settled into a strong 6/8 groove.  The improv section was much freer and angrier, giving us the first taste of the inner mind of Let Go.  Ending with a ‘bell’ toll, Rainforest was a great emotional journey of sounds.

Rainforest set the structural precedent for the next two tunes (Disa & All Animals are Beautiful): strong groove based head in irregular time, heavily free middle section, with a return to the groove at the end.

Disa by drummer Finlay Panter was rhythmically driven (9/4, 4/4, 5/4 time) and it was immediately clear that each member of Let Spin has a clearly distinctive compositional voice. Whilst the improv sections in the first three tunes went in similar directions, the tunes were clearly characterised by their writers.

Fourth in the set was the guitar led E.V.A., a tune by Guitarist Moss Freed. The sax danced on top of the guitar line like the crest on a wave: sax sat perfectly with the guitar and was yet comfortably independent.  E.V.A. was the first tune that ‘kept time’ throughout, refreshingly departing from the signature sound of the set thus far.  It was well placed in the set and by the applause level afterwards, it was an audience favourite.

The final tune of the first set was saxophonist Chris Williams’ ‘Walt’s Waltz’, a great tune in which the raucous Led Bib influences are clear.  (We initially understood the title to be ‘Waltz Waltz’ and with the 6/4 riff this made sense.  Nice to have an extra layer of meaning). The massive sound was ice water to the face (we like ice water) and the epic chaos in the middle was fun and a great way to end the first set.

Let Spin resists many of the traditional quartet idioms, for example each member taking a ‘token solo’. Sax acts as a voice, taking the tune and often giving us the most explosive solos. There are clear sections ‘without sax’ in which the various band members let loose, each musician dripping with virtuosity and creating varied and complex sound worlds.

The second set opened with 102 Hill Street, a tune from their first album Let Spin. The band came alive in this tune – a triumphal announcement letting us know that they were ready to play and show us what they’ve got.

Let Go contains two tunes from each band member. Their website describes them as ‘a band that is not afraid to make the most of their individual voices’. This is actually true (hurray for accurate band descriptions). The variety of the timbres in which they inhabit makes it much more interesting and accessible.

They play on this and the audience were asked to guess who wrote the next tune: Rotation. (we got it right! Panter.  Stickers for us).  His naturally rhythmically driven writing identifies strongly with him.

Next up was Killing our Dreams (Williams), a beautiful tune, as near to a ballad as we would ever hear with Let Spin. The writing for sax is highly lyrical, with repetition within a small range with Freed playing beautifully underneath. The band built behind the simple sax line in an utterly symphonic way in its colour and texture. The sound was huge, and the symphonic effect was completed by the three tonic major chords upon which it finished. True Beethoven.

Rothko’s Field had a latin flavour with Goller, Panter and Freed filling the space perfectly with their signature taste. Up and At Them (Williams) finished the set. The strong bass line played as ever energetically and powerfully by Goller, led to a great solo from Freed and top playing from Panter.  The massive timbres were a great way to finish.

To such applause they gave us an encore lullaby with which to send us home, the final tune from their first album, A Change Is Coming.

Let Spin certainly gave us a show. We cannot undervalue the great and distinctive voices brought by each member of the band. The variety is great, keeps us listening and exploring. Williams, Freed, Goller and Panter each write so powerfully and differently it is a wonderful thing when it all comes together.

Check out their rest of their tour dates here.
Buy the albums here .

Let Spin Album Launch @ Vortex, Saturday 24th October 2015
Set 1
1. I like to Sound Like a Rainforest
2. Disa
3. All Animals Are Beautiful
4. E.V.A.
5. Walt’s Waltz

Set 2
6. 102 Hill Street
7. Rotation
8. Killing Our Dreams
9. Rothko’s Field
10. Up and At them
Encore: A Change is Coming

-BF

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Jazz @ 50th Wedding Anniversary

We had the privilege of playing jazz for a 50th Wedding Anniversary for a couple from Barnet, North London.  We got some lovely feedback.  CONGRATULATIONS on 50 years from all at BF! 50th wedding anniversary jazz barnet north london blue flamingo

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#BFRecommends September Gigs 2015 (London, Jazz)

There’s a plethora of stuff going on in September – but we’ve picked the gigs we’d most like to see!  Maybe see you there….

4th Sept 2015 CROWLEY/KANE/MADDREN @ The Con
Tickets: £5  info here

7th Sept 2015 MIKE CHILLINGWORTH SEPTET @ The Oxford
Tickets: £10/£5  info here

11th Sept 2015 AYANNA WITTER-JOHNSON @ King’s Place
Tickets: £6.50  info here

12th Sept 2015 DAVE O’HIGGINS @ 606
Tickets: Book a Table info here

23rd -26th Sept 2015 LOOSE TUBES @ Ronnie Scott’s
Tickets:  £30/£35/£45 info here

27th Sept 2015 MUSICIANS’ COMPANY YOUNG JAZZ MUSICIAN OF THE YEAR 2015 @ Pizza Express
Tickets: £15 info here

-BF

 

More September gigs here. 

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REVIEW: Narcissus at Pizza Express 04.01.15

 

Narcissus pete lee josh arcoleo ali thynne tom varrall huw foster

We are big Narcissus fans and we were looking forward to hearing them at the Pizza Express Jazz Club on this brisk January afternoon.  Last time we reviewed  them almost exactly a year ago, we described them as: ‘sublime chaos, a great schizophrenic identity crisis of genre which against all odds makes sense.’

Eager to hear their signature pop grooves and melodic lines that weave through the Narcissus sound, we were a little unsettled to hear at the top of the set an aimless sound world.  Whilst pianist and leader Peter Lee still played with heartbreaking beauty we were longing to hear melody with regular time, longing to know where this tune was going.  So unusual was this start, that when the melodic ‘head’ was breathed into life by sax player Josh Arcoleo, it was like the shoulders relaxing down after being taught with tension.  No wonder it had that effect: Lee told us afterwards that the tune is entitled, Bi-Polar.  The ‘aimless’ alongside ‘happiness’ juxtaposition is a new sound to Narcissus.  Highly effective and definitely an unnerving start to the set it was good to hear the group play slightly riskier tunes.

Dependency starts as many Narcissus tunes do, with a piano introduction: hymn-like homophonic sounds.  It has parallels with The Dreamer – a cover played later in the set.  Dependency, with it’s lilting 6/8 rhythms, also welcomed guitarist Tom Varrall to the stage.  In some ways it’s a very ‘classical’ tune – with an exposition of the melody and a haunting piano cadenza leading back to the head.   The tune ended as it started, with the rest of the band adding small sounds, like a memory, lost in the echoes of subtone. Mirror Stage, a tune familiar to regular listeners starts with sparse unison chords, sounding like a syncopated bell chiming on the hour.  The much awaited delicious groove appears, alongside beautiful melodies. This is possibly our favourite tune in the set.  Lee’s Dave Smith synth emerged.  We’ve raved about how much we love it and it’s radiophonic workshop sounds before, so we won’t so do again here.  Narcissus went crazy.  Arcoleo and Lee were epic and Varrall played a great funky guitar riff behind the madness.

The final tune of the first set, Did you have something to say? (Lee added, ‘in this case, no’) included most notably a beautiful bass solo from Foster.  Most distinctively it ended with a frankly funny 80s synth sound wall from Lee.  It appeared to have the rest of the band laughing too.  It acted as a response to the tune’s question:  Did you actually have something to say?  No.  Make of that what you will.

Untitled announced the start of the second set – with an epic solo from Varrall.  It’s perhaps the most ‘pop’ influenced tune of the set, with groove juxtaposed by lyrical balladic melodies.  Criss Cross featured the beautiful lines of Huw Foster on bass – giving space to explore that sound world with no hurry.  Just before they started their only cover of the set, The Dreamer, Lee explained that this tune demonstrated the more electronic route these guys have decided to pursue.  That comes as no surprise – the distinctive sound of Lee’s synth playing have become more and more involved and each time we hear them play – and choosing the electronic vibes of this Mehliana tune fit in perfectly. The Dreamer segued seamlessly into Writer’s Block  a tune where you never know what’s coming next.  Yes, we happen to know this tune fairly well, it’s performed on most their gigs and is strong melodically and harmonically.  Yet still it is filled with surprises and the band work so well as a whole on this tune. Narcissus are an electric ensemble, juxtaposing solid groove with utter chaos.  They sit together so well and love listening to one another play.  There are moments that are just massive – and then a mere breath later, there is a perfect silence.  Maybe that is what they do best.  Cherish the quiet.

Dear Narissus – please please please record an album.

Line up and set list are below.  You can find out more here.

~BF
Pete Lee’s Narcissus at Pizza Express Jazz Club, Dean Street, 13:30, 04.01.2015

Peter Lee – Piano/Synth/Compositions
Ali Thynne – Drums
Josh Arcoleo – Sax
Huw Foster – Bass
Tom Varrall – Guitar

Set 1

1) Bi-Polar
2) Dependency
3) Mirror Stage
4) Did you have something to say?

Set 2

1) Untitled
2) Criss Cross
3) The Dreamer (Mehliana Cover)
4) Writer’s Block

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Review: Stoop Quintet @ QEH Front Room, 19.11.14

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What a delicious treat it was finally to hear Stoop Quintet play at the QEH Front Room. Introduced as the ‘passionate and unpredictable’ group from the University of York, this was actually (unlike much jazz promo) a fabulously accurate description.

Starting with the punchy Stoop Kid, its angular shape unashamedly announced the group’s arrival with a kick.  Next up was Fable where the hypnotic minimalistic melody developed into beautiful guitar (Alex Munk) and sax (Sam Miles) unisons, with dovetailing piano lines. Miles played a beautiful tenor solo on this: he has a rich warm tone. Munk’s soulful solo sat easily alongside Miles’ and the pairs great soloing are a feature of the group.

Their third tune, Ranch, began with a simplistic repeated chordal piano idea – we had no idea where the tune was going to go. Once again it led to a screamer of a solo from Miles, with the tune ending in a way that can only be described as falling apart – leaves beautifully falling from a tree to the ground.

Despite Jonathan Brigg being band leader, the ‘rhythm’ section of Dave Smyth (Kit), Flo Moore (Upright Bass) and Brigg, feature significantly less as soloists within the ensemble. Instead they hold the complex grooves together, support and interplay with Miles and Munk like an experienced family and put the spark into the group. It’s actually rather refreshing that they don’t feel a need to solo to ‘prove’ themselves. The group would be severely lacking if they were not the backbone.

We wonder if the fifth tune Turn was so named due to the pedal-like melody ending with an embellishment, or ‘turn’, or whether it is that the tune reflects the idea of the piece as a whole. Either way – the relentless ostinato group that sat underneath the solos was beautiful.

The penultimate tune Confession was described by leader Brigg as exactly that: you will ‘hear our confessions’. Indeed the 7/4 groove set a tone of unease which led to a dark and rhapsodic piano solo by Brigg, really pushing the tonality of the piece. Munk and Miles soloed in by far the freest tune of the set. That said, the returns to the really rather rocky grooves acted as pillars supporting the work.

Having traversed many of the genres of contemporary music, SQ finished with Soldier On. Moore moved to the bow for this solemn and beautiful work. The simple but effective lyrical melody rhythmically (intentionally or not) fit to the words ‘Sol-dier on’. The melody thus literally telling us what to do.

Stoop Quintet are characterised by ostinato-esque melodies followed by chaos. They’re not afraid to let the music fall apart, disapparate* with timed elegance, then suddenly bring it back together as a coherent whole. It was a well thought out set, with movement of ideas and textures between tunes. Definitely worth seeing live.

Check our their website here. Set details below.

~BF

Stoop Quintet
Part of the Young & Serious arm of the EFG London Jazz Festival.
Foyer at the Queen Elizabeth Hall 19th November 2014, 18:00

Piano/Compositions: Jonathan Brigg
Guitar: Alex Munk
Sax: Sam Miles
Bass: Flo Moore
Drums: Dave Smyth

1) Stoop Kid ‘Inspired the the Hey Arnold character who had a difficult time getting off the front step’
2) Fable
3) Ranch
4) Spring Song
5) Turn
6) Confession
7) Soldier On

*yes, it’s actually a word, even if JK invented it.

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London Jazz Festival: Top Picks

Blue Flamingo London jazz Festival 2014 Freddie Gavita, London City Big Band Sam Leak George Crowley Trisch Clowes Stoop Quintet Zoe Rahman Alice Zawadzki Soweto Kinch The Dixie Ticklers Ezra Collective Led Bib

We can’t get to them all – but here are our picks, based on those we know/have seen live.  There’s going to be so much greatness going on!

Sat 15th Nov, FREDDIE GAVITA, St John’s Downshire Hill, 19:30. Read our review here.  MORE

Sun 16th Nov, LONDON CITY BIG BAND, Spice of Life, 13:30. MORE

Sun 16th Nov, SAM LEAK BIG BAND, Spice of Life, 20:00. MORE

Mon 17th Nov, GEORGE CROWLEY‘S CAN OF WORMS,  The Oxford, 21:00. MORE

Tues 18th Nov, TRISH CLOWES & GUY BARKER w/ BBC CO, Southbank Centre/QE Hall, 19:30. MORE

Weds 19th Nov, STOOP QUINTET, Southbank Centre/Front Room, 18:00. Read our feature here. MORE

Weds 19th Nov, JESSIE BANNISTER & ZOE RAHMAN, PizzaExpress Jazz Club, 20:30. MORE

Weds 19th Nov, ALICE ZAWADZKI, Royal Albert Hall/Elgar Room, 21:45. Read our review hereMORE

Thurs 20th Nov, SOWETO KINCH, 606 Club, 20:30. MORE

Thurs 20th Nov, THE DIXIE TICKLERS, The Golden Hinde, 20:30. MORE

Fri 21st Nov, EZRA COLLECTIVE, Southbank Centre/Front Room, 17:30. MORE

Sat 22nd Nov, LED BIB, Vortex, 20:30. MORE

~BF